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EAS 1150 - Severe Weather Phenomena

Semester: Summer
Instructor: Wysocki
Credits: 3

A description of the structure of the Earth's atmosphere and forces that govern its motion is presented and then applied to understanding the aspects of severe weather, including snowstorms/lake effect snow, windstorms, tornadoes, thunderstorms, tropical cyclones, El Nino, floods, drought, and heat waves.

EAS 1310 - Basic Principles of Meteorology

Semester: Fall
Instructor: Wysocki
Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): Curiosity about weather.

Simplified treatment of the structure of the atmosphere: heat balance of the Earth; general and secondary circulations; air masses, fronts, and cyclones; and hurricanes, thunderstorms, tornadoes, and atmospheric condensation. The optional 1-credit laboratory for the course is offered as EAS 1330.

EAS 1330 - Basic Meteorology Lab

Semester: Fall
Instructor: Wysocki
Credits: 1
Corequisite(s): EAS 1310

Required for atmospheric science majors but is optional for other students taking EAS 1310.

EAS 1340 - Weather Analysis and Forecasting

Semester: Spring
Instructor: Wysocki
Credits: 1
Prerequisite(s): EAS 1310 and EAS 1330

Serves as an extension of the EAS 1330 first-year majors lab. The course provides an opportunity for formal weather briefings and explores specific atmospheric storms (synoptic and mesoscale, including the climatology of each storm type) through assigned readings, map analysis, and weather discussions.

EAS 2500 - Meteorological Observations and Instruments

Semester: Spring
Instructor: TBA
Credits: 4
Prerequisite(s): EAS 1310

Covers methods and principles of meteorological measurements and observations including surface, free-air, and remote systems. Also covers instrument siting, mounting, and protection; instrument response characteristics, calibration, and standardization; and recorders and data logging systems. Laboratory exercises are in observation and data analysis.

EAS 2680 - Climate and Global Warming

Semester: Spring
Instructor: DeGaetano
Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): basic college math

Familiarizes students from a range of disciplines with such contemporary issues in climatology as global warming and El Nino. Introduces the natural greenhouse effect, past climates, and observed and projected climate changes and impacts. Also covers natural climate variations (e.g., El Nino) and their consequences and predictability. Readings focus on recent scientific findings related to climate change.

EAS 2900 - Computer Programming and Meteorology Software

Semester: Spring
Instructor: Wysocki
Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): EAS 1310; MATH 1110 or equivalent

Introduction to Python computer programming and visual software packages specifically tailored for meteorological application usage. Topics include basic Python (this includes problem analysis, algorithm development, and program writing and execution), data manipulation, and instruction in the use of Graphic visual display tools. The goal is for students to develop a basic foundation of important computer tools available for diagnostic meteorological applications to aid in weather forecasting and research.

EAS 2960 - Forecast Competition

Semester: Fall / Spring
Instructor: Wilks
Credits: 1
Prerequisite(s): undergraduate standing in atmospheric science or permission of instructor.

Two-semester course providing daily exercise in probabilistic weather forecasting in which students compete to forecast local weather most skillfully. Students enroll for two consecutive semesters; credit awarded after second semester; may be repeated for credit

EAS 3050 - Climate Dynamics

Semester: Fall
Instructor: Chen, Ault
Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): two semesters of calculus and one semester of physics

Discusses processes that determine climate and contribute to its change, including atmospheric radiation, ocean circulation, and atmospheric dynamics. Investigates contemporary climate change issues and discusses them in the context of natural variability of the system. Additional project for students enrolled in graduate version.

EAS 3340 - Microclimatology

Semester: Spring
Instructor: Wilks
Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): physics course

The relationship of radiant energy, temperature, wind, and moisture in the atmosphere near the ground. The interplay between physical processes of the atmosphere, plant canopies, and soil is examined with emphasis on the energy balance.

EAS 3410 - Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Hydrostatics

Semester: Fall
Instructor: DeGaetano / Wysocki
Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): one year of calculus and one semester of physics

Introduction to the thermodynamics and hydrostatics of the atmosphere and to the methods of description and quantitative analysis used in meteorology. Topics include thermodynamic processes of dry air, water vapor, and moist air, and concepts of hydrostatics and stability.

EAS 3420 - Atmospheric Dynamics

Semester: Spring
Instructor: Chen
Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): familiarity with multivariate calculus (e.g., MATH 2930, 2130, or 2220 or equivalent); one semester of university physics

Introduction to the basic equations and techniques used to understand motion in the atmosphere, with an emphasis on the space and time scales typical of storm systems (the synoptic scale). Derives the governing equations of atmospheric flow from first principles and applies them to middle latitude and tropical meteorology. Topics include balanced flow, atmospheric waves, circulation, and vorticity.

EAS 3520 - Synoptic Meteorology I

Semester: Spring
Instructor: Wysocki
Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): EAS 3410
Corequisite(s): EAS 3420

Study of weather map analysis and forecasting techniques by applying the principles of fluid and heat flow. Strengthens previously introduced meteorological concepts that are applied to forecasting midlatitude synoptic scale weather systems, such as cyclones, anticyclones, jet streams, fronts, and waves.

EAS 4350 - Statistics in Meteorology and Climatology

Semester: Fall
Instructor: Wilks, Pryor
Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): one introductory course each in statistics (e.g., AEM 2100) and calculus

Statistical methods used in climatology, operational weather forecasting, and selected meteorological research applications. Includes statistical characteristics of meteorological data including probability distributions and correlation structures. Covers operational forecasts derived from multiple regression models, including the MOS system and forecast evaluation techniques. Additional project for students enrolled in graduate version.

EAS 4470 - Physical Meteorology

Semester: Fall
Instructor: DeGaetano
Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): one year each of calculus and physics

Primarily a survey of natural phenomena of the atmosphere, with emphasis on their underlying physical principles. Topics include an introduction to atmospheric radiation processes, atmospheric optics and electricity, microphysical cloud processes, and principles of radar probing of the atmosphere. Offered alternate years.

EAS 4510 - Synoptic Meteorology II

Semester: Fall
Instructor: Colucci
Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): EAS 3410 and 3420

Structure and dynamics of large-scale midlatitude weather systems, such as cyclones, anticyclones, and waves, with consideration of processes that contribute to temperature changes and precipitation. Lab sessions involve real-time weather forecasting and the computer application of a numerical model of the atmosphere to study selected large-scale midlatitude weather events.

EAS 4560 - Mesoscale Meteorology

Semester: Spring
Instructor: Colucci
Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): EAS 3410 and 3420 or permission of instructor

Structure and dynamics of midlatitude mesoscale weather systems such as fronts, jets, squall lines, convective complexes, precipitation bands, downslope windstorms, mountain breezes, seas breeze circulations, and lake effect snowstorms. The course also considers tropical weather systems and mesoscale modeling. Offered alternate years

EAS 4570 - Atmospheric Air Pollution

Semester: Fall
Instructor: Wysocki
Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): EAS 3410 or one course in thermodynamics, and one semester of chemistry, or permission of instructor

Examines sources, effects, transport, measurement, and controls of air pollution. Discusses the basic principles in each area with an emphasis on their local, regional, and global impacts. Offered alternate years.

EAS 4700 - Advanced Weather Forecasting and Analysis

Semester: Spring
Instructor: Wysocki
Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): EAS 3520 and 4510

Applied course focusing on weather forecasting and analysis techniques for various regions around the world. Lectures emphasize the application of student's knowledge of atmospheric dynamics, thermodynamics, and computer data analysis to forecast the development and movement of multiscale weather systems. Students participate in weekly forecast discussions; write daily forecasts that include a synoptic discussion, quantitative precipitation forecasts, and severe weather outlook for the forecast region; and lead class discussion on assigned readings.

EAS 4800 - Introduction to Atmospheric Chemistry

Semester: Fall
Instructor: Hess
Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): CHEM 2090, MATH 1920, PHYS 1112 or equivalent, or permission of instructor

This course investigates the science behind changes in our atmosphere's composition and its relation to global change. Students examine the chemistry and physics that determines atmospheric composition on global scales including the effects of biogeochemistry and atmospheric photochemistry. Cross-listed as BEE 4800.

EAS 4820 - Atmospheric Modeling

Semester: Spring
Instructor: Mahowald
Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): differential equations, introductory computer background, junior standing or above or permission of instructor

Climate and numerical weather prediction models are important tools for policy and science. This course describes the basic principle of the numerics in these models, including dynamical cores and subgrid-parameterization. Included is a discussion of evaluation of models and effective presentation of model results.

EAS 4840 - Inverse Methods in the Natural Sciences

Semester: Fall
Instructor: Hysell
Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): MATH 2940

An exploration of solution methods for inverse problems with examples taken from geophysics and related fields, with particular attention to making inferences from inaccurate, incomplete, or inconsistent physical data. Applications include medical and seismic tomography, earthquake location, image processing, and radio/radar imaging. Linear algebra (including condition numbers) and probability and statistics (including error analysis, Bayes theorem, Gibbs distribution, and Markov chains) are reviewed. Methods covered include nonlinear least-squares, maximum likelihood methods, and local and global optimization methods, including simulated annealing and genetic algorithms.

EAS 4850 - Climate Information and Management

Semester: Spring
Instructor: Riha / Wysocki
Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): statistics and at least one physical science or calculus course

People mitigate climate impacts, use climate as a resource, and prepare for climate hazards, including floods, freezes, high winds, heat waves, and droughts. Students learn how to integrate climate information with other decision support tools to adapt, mitigate, and respond to climate variability and change.

EAS 4860 - Understanding Tropical Meteorology on Hourly to Interannual Timescales

Semester: Spring
Instructor: Ault
Credits: 4
Prerequisite(s): EAS 3050 and EAS 3410
Corequisite(s): EAS 3420

This course will examine the atmospheric processes responsible for inducing variations in tropical weather and climate on daily to interannual timescales. Computer lab visualization and numerical modeling exercises will deepen student understanding of tropical meteorology, develop programming proficiency, and enhance scientific writing skills. Graduate students will be required to use a numerical model to simulate some aspect of tropical meteorology and present their final project as an 8-12 min. conference-style presentation at the end of the semester.

EAS 4870 - Introduction to Radar Remote Sensing

Semester: Spring
Instructor: Hysell
Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): PHYS 2208 or 2213 or equivalent, or permission of instructor

Fundamentals of radar, antennas, and remote sensing. Exposes students to the principles underlying the analysis and design of antennas used for communication and for radar-related applications. Students also encounter both a mathematical and a practical description of how radars function, how their performance can be optimized for different applications, and how signals acquired by them can be processed. The objective is to familiarize students with a wide variety of radars rather than to turn them into practicing radar engineers. Each topic is developed from basic principles so students with a wide variety of backgrounds are able to take the course. Emphasizes radar applications in geophysics, meteorology and atmospheric sciences, and astronomy and space sciences. Gives special attention to radar remote sensing of the Earth from spacecraft.

EAS 4940 - Special Topics in Atmospheric Science

Semester: Fall / Spring
Instructor: Staff
Credits: 1-8

The department teaches 'trial' courses under this number. Offerings vary by semester and are advertised by the department before the semester starts. The same course is not offered more than twice.

EAS 4960 - Internship Experience in Atmospheric Science

Semester: Fall / Spring
Instructor: Moore
Credits: 1-2
Prerequisite(s): EAS 3040; enrollment in EES semester in Hawaii

During the last 3.5 weeks of the semester students carry out a service-learning project with a local NGO, environmental business, government agency, research lab, or educational facility. Projects are carefully designed with the student, sponsoring agency, and faculty member. A final report is required.

EAS 4970 - Individual Study in Atmospheric Science

Semester: Fall / Spring
Instructor: Staff
Credits: 1-6

Topics are arranged at the beginning of the semester for individual study or for group discussions. Students must register using independent study form.

EAS 4980 - Teaching Experience in Atmospheric Science

Semester: Fall / Spring
Instructor: Staff
Credits: 1-2

The student assists in teaching an EAS course appropriate to his or her previous training. The student meets with a discussion or laboratory section, prepares course materials, grades assignments, and regularly discusses course objectives and teaching techniques with the faculty member in charge of the course. Students must register using independent study form.

EAS 4990 - Undergraduate Research in Atmospheric Science

Semester: Fall / Spring
Instructor: Staff
Credits: TBA

Independent research on current problems in atmospheric science. Students must register using independent study form.

EAS 5050 - Fluid Dynamics in the Earth Sciences

Semester: Spring
Instructor: Cathles / Wysocki
Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): MATH through 2940, PHYS through 2208 or 2214, or permission of instructor

The Earth system provides many fascinating examples of fluid dynamics phenomena that are also of societal importance. Turbulent convection in the outer core generates the earth's magnetic field. The viscous mantle (outer half of the Earth) is slowly but vigorously convecting, and consequently the Earth's surface is dynamic. Viscosity is not important in the oceans and atmosphere, but the flow there is fast enough for the rotation of the Earth to become a dominant control. Electromagnetic effects again dominate in the solar wind and magnetosphere. This course investigates the Earth using fluid dynamics. For students in the Earth sciences it provides an opportunity to learn the insights that can be provided by fluid dynamics. For students who know fluid dynamics from other fields the course provides spectacular applications and an opportunity to learn about the Earth system in a different and unusually fundamental way. Offered alternate years.

EAS 5051 - Climate Dynamics

Semester: Fall
Instructor: Mahowald
Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): two semesters of calculus and one semester of physics

Discusses processes that determine climate and contribute to its change, including atmospheric radiation, ocean circulation, and atmospheric dynamics. Investigates contemporary climate change issues and discusses them in the context of natural variability of the system. Additional project for students enrolled in graduate version.

EAS 5750 - Planetary Atmospheres

Semester: Fall
Instructor: Gierasch
Credits: 4

Introduction to radiative transfer in emitting and scattering atmospheres. Radiative energy balance and radiative equilibrium. Structures of the atmospheres in the solar system. Introduction to motions in atmospheres. Planetary examples of balanced flows. Mesoscale waves, wave absorption and wave accelerations. Planetary waves. The influence of wave accelerations on thermal structure and composition. Introduction to atmospheric chemistry. Dynamical transports. Observations. At the level of Andrews, Atmospheric Physics. Cross-listed as ASTRO 6575.

EAS 5840 - Inverse Methods in the Natural Sciences

Semester: Fall
Instructor: Hysell
Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): MATH 2940

An exploration of solution methods for inverse problems with examples taken from geophysics and related fields, with particular attention to making inferences from inaccurate, incomplete, or inconsistent physical data. Applications include medical and seismic tomography, earthquake location, image processing, and radio/radar imaging. Linear algebra (including condition numbers) and probability and statistics (including error analysis, Bayes theorem, Gibbs distribution, and Markov chains) are reviewed. Methods covered include nonlinear least-squares, maximum likelihood methods, and local and global optimization methods, including simulated annealing and genetic algorithms. Students in EAS 5840 are expected to complete and present a substantial class project to be negotiated with the instructor.

EAS 6480 - Air Quality and Atmospheric Chemistry

Semester: Fall
Instructor: Zhang
Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): first-year chemistry and thermodynamics (or equivalent); graduate standing or permission of instructor

Factors determining air quality and effects of air pollutants on public health, ecological systems and global climate change. Students examine the source-to-receptor relationship of major air pollutants with an emphasis on the physical and chemical fundamentals of atmospheric transport and transformation. Topics include photochemical smog, atmospheric aerosols, atmospheric transport and deposition, emissions from energy systems, introduction to air quality monitoring and modeling, and air quality management. Cross-listed as MAE 6480.

EAS 6520 - Advanced Atmospheric Dynamics

Semester: Spring
Instructor: Colucci
Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): EAS 3410 and 3420 or equivalents

Covers quasigeostrophic theory, atmospheric waves, hydrodynamics instability, general circulation of the atmosphere, and other topics selected from among numerical weather prediction and tropical mesoscale, and middle atmosphere processes according to student interest. Offered alternate years.

EAS 6660 - Applied Multivariate Statistics

Semester: Spring
Instructor: Wilks
Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): multivariable calculus, matrix algebra, two statistics courses

Statistical techniques for multivariable data. Topics include multivariate exploratory data analysis, the multivariate normal distribution, parametric and nonparametric inference about multivariate means, principal component analysis, canonical correlation analysis, discriminant analysis, and cluster analysis. Emphasizes geophysical applications, using primarily atmospheric and oceanographic data as examples, but the development is general enough to be of broader interest. Offered alternate years.

EAS 6750 - Modeling the Soil-Plant-Atmosphere System

Semester: Spring
Instructor: Riha
Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): EAS/CSS 4830 or equivalent

Introduction to the structure and use of soil-plant-atmosphere models. Topics include modeling plant physiology, morphology, and development; potential crop production and crop production limited by moisture and nutrient availability; plant-plant competition; and land surface processes, as well as model data requirements, validation, and scale. Discuses use of soil-plant-atmosphere models for teaching, research, extension, and policy formation. Cross-listed as CSS 6750.

EAS 6860 - Understanding Tropical Meteorology on Hourly to Interannual Timescales

Semester: Spring
Instructor: Ault
Credits: 4
Prerequisite(s): EAS 3050 and EAS 3410
Corequisite(s): EAS 3420

This course will examine the atmospheric processes responsible for inducing variations in tropical weather and climate on daily to interannual timescales. Computer lab visualization and numerical modeling exercises will deepen student understanding of tropical meteorology, develop programming proficiency, and enhance scientific writing skills. Graduate students will be required to use a numerical model to simulate some aspect of tropical meteorology and present their final project as an 8-12 min. conference-style presentation at the end of the semester.

EAS 6920 - Special Topics in Atmospheric Science

Semester: Fall / Spring
Instructor: Staff
Credits: 1-6

Study of topics in atmospheric science that are more specialized or different from other courses. Special topics depend on staff and student interests.

EAS 7110 - Upper Atmospheric and Space Physics

Semester: Fall / Spring
Instructor: Hysell
Credits: 1-6

Seminar course.

EAS 8500 - Masters Level Thesis Research in Atmospheric Science

Semester: Fall / Spring
Instructor: Staff
Credits: TBA

Thesis research for atmospheric science master's students.

EAS 9500 - Graduate Level Dissertation Research in Atmospheric Science

Semester: Fall / Spring
Instructor: Staff
Credits: TBA

Dissertation research for atmospheric science Ph.D. students only before 'A' exam has been passed.

EAS 9510 - Doctoral Level Dissertation Research in Atmospheric Science

Semester: Fall / Spring
Instructor: Staff
Credits: TBA

Dissertation research for atmospheric science Ph.D. candidates after 'A' exam has been passed.